Is the Porn Industry Moving from L.A. to Vegas?

The Las Vegas Sun reports today that as many as a dozen California adult film studios have opened offices in Las Vegas since 2012, when L.A. County passed a regulation requiring adult film actors to wear condoms in sex scenes.

The law was championed by AIDS activists, not because there was a problem in the adult film industry with actors and actresses spreading HIV—as only one adult film actor has tested positive for HIV since 2004 when the industry began testing all performers, and that performer is believed to have been exposed to HIV outside of work.

But AIDS awareness groups feel that showing unprotected sex on film encourages those who watch the films to have unprotected sex.

The adult film industry sees this as a First Amendment issue.  Adult films are primarily about fantasy, not sex education, and it sees the requirement to show a ritual condom display in every film as a buzz kill, much as if they were being required to show a marriage ritual before every fuck scene.

Since 2012 when the new condom regulation was passed, there has been an estimated 90% drop in the number of adult film permits issued in L.A. County, which has been the center of the adult film industry for decades. Porn was a $6 billion business in California and employed about 10,000 people, but the law has forced the filmmakers underground and out-of-state.

Nevada currently has very few laws on the books regulating adult (or any other) films and may be the most libertarian state in the U.S. when it comes to First Amendment rights and personal freedoms, but can they withstand the sex scolds who are already filing complaints?

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